Artist Statement







As a lifelong city dweller, I have a need to extend my vision of the world beyond the urban landscape.

 

My work utilizes charcoal, paint, pastel, and a camera, with which I create images of the places, people, and objects I encounter.  I’ve traveled in Africa and North America and widely through Europe.  I love painting a panoramic big sky landscape or the physical attitude of an individual as much as a close observation of a branch.  All are forms of portraiture, my representations of all the elements and virtual personality that I experience.

 

My practice of drawing and painting allow me to open a window on a moment, to hint at a story in some cases and a moment of clarity in others.  The work is intended to be welcoming and informal, encouraging contemplation in the viewer.

 

Recently I have begun to take more risks with subject matter, materials and their application. In addition to lifting my landscape gaze upward from the distant horizon line to the intersection of trees and sky, I have been experimenting with other aerial events, ranging from star filled night skies to explosions, both celebratory and murderous.  These will appear online soon, but can be seen on my instagram feed, @cushla_studio.   

 

I am open to exhibition opportunities, and welcome commissions!

Cushla Naegele

NYC

Spring 2018

info@cushlanaegelestudio.com

 

 

 







MATERIALS

Oil and Acrylic

Working with oil paint represents the slow, patient, right brain process of technique and dedication.  I find that oil provides the most intense and luminous colors, the greatest range and depth of pigments of any medium I use. The speed with which acrylic paints dry makes them suitable to fast, expressive work.  I often move back and forth between dry media such as charcoal and the quick drying acrylic.  In general, my practice with acrylic is limited to black and white, although occasionally I throw some color in.  Supports include wood, linen, and paper for all works.   

Charcoal, Pastel, Pencil, and Ink

Charcoal is the simplest and most elemental medium. A charred twig, lump or stick of vine charcoal feels most like an extension of my hand. The depth of black acheived by a soft piece of compressed charcoal is sublime; smudging and erasing into that black creates yet more volume. While I love paint for its myriad color combinations and choices, this multiplicity can itself present a roadblock, the hundreds of bristles in a brush agents of distance between my hand and the image I'm making. In general, with my portraits, I try to capture the subject in mid sentence or movement. The type of paper is as important as its size. If the paper hasn't got enough tooth or fiber to hold the pastel or charcoal mark, or I feel it is too soft or unyielding, I prime it with a gritty gesso. This allows greater flexiblility with the medium - I can smudge, erase and dig into it without the paper disintegrating in response.

Two of these were recently purchased by the United Way of NYC for their new corporate headquarters! 

Pencil and Ink are, for me, largely linear.  While sometimes I use graphite for its tonal qualities, my favorite use of pencils and pens is for line drawing.  Having been an avid Rapidograph user for years, I find I really enjoy using fine point Sharpies which never get clogged or have to be cleaned.

All materials used are all of the highest professional quality.


Art Educator

I work privately as well as with the non-profit organization Studio In A School, in NYC, as a teaching artist. We work with school age children throughout the city, bringing abroad range of skills, enthusiasm and cultural enrichment to public school students.

 

BLOG SECTIONS

Statement, Materials, Process, Teaching

Artist Statement







As a lifelong city dweller, I have a need to extend my vision of the world beyond the urban landscape.

 

My work utilizes charcoal, paint, pastel, and a camera, with which I create images of the places, people, and objects I encounter.  I’ve traveled in Africa and North America and widely through Europe.  I love painting a panoramic big sky landscape or the physical attitude of an individual as much as a close observation of a branch.  All are forms of portraiture, my representations of all the elements and virtual personality that I experience.

 

My practice of drawing and painting allow me to open a window on a moment, to hint at a story in some cases and a moment of clarity in others.  The work is intended to be welcoming and informal, encouraging contemplation in the viewer.

 

Recently I have begun to take more risks with subject matter, materials and their application. In addition to lifting my landscape gaze upward from the distant horizon line to the intersection of trees and sky, I have been experimenting with other aerial events, ranging from star filled night skies to explosions, both celebratory and murderous.  These will appear online soon, but can be seen on my instagram feed, @cushla_studio.   

 

I am open to exhibition opportunities, and welcome commissions!

Cushla Naegele

NYC

Spring 2018

info@cushlanaegelestudio.com

 

 

 







MATERIALS

Oil and Acrylic

Working with oil paint represents the slow, patient, right brain process of technique and dedication.  I find that oil provides the most intense and luminous colors, the greatest range and depth of pigments of any medium I use. The speed with which acrylic paints dry makes them suitable to fast, expressive work.  I often move back and forth between dry media such as charcoal and the quick drying acrylic.  In general, my practice with acrylic is limited to black and white, although occasionally I throw some color in.  Supports include wood, linen, and paper for all works.   

Charcoal, Pastel, Pencil, and Ink

Charcoal is the simplest and most elemental medium. A charred twig, lump or stick of vine charcoal feels most like an extension of my hand. The depth of black acheived by a soft piece of compressed charcoal is sublime; smudging and erasing into that black creates yet more volume. While I love paint for its myriad color combinations and choices, this multiplicity can itself present a roadblock, the hundreds of bristles in a brush agents of distance between my hand and the image I'm making. In general, with my portraits, I try to capture the subject in mid sentence or movement. The type of paper is as important as its size. If the paper hasn't got enough tooth or fiber to hold the pastel or charcoal mark, or I feel it is too soft or unyielding, I prime it with a gritty gesso. This allows greater flexiblility with the medium - I can smudge, erase and dig into it without the paper disintegrating in response.

Two of these were recently purchased by the United Way of NYC for their new corporate headquarters! 

Pencil and Ink are, for me, largely linear.  While sometimes I use graphite for its tonal qualities, my favorite use of pencils and pens is for line drawing.  Having been an avid Rapidograph user for years, I find I really enjoy using fine point Sharpies which never get clogged or have to be cleaned.

All materials used are all of the highest professional quality.


Art Educator

I work privately as well as with the non-profit organization Studio In A School, in NYC, as a teaching artist. We work with school age children throughout the city, bringing abroad range of skills, enthusiasm and cultural enrichment to public school students.

 

BLOG SECTIONS